The brilliantly eccentric Jonathan Pierce

By: Hugh O’Boyle

Here tonight at the Bristol O2 Academy, proud New-Yorkers Drums are a long, long way from home. From first bursting arrays of sunshine in their EP Summertime!, Drums wasted no time in finding fame. Unfortunately, despite their perfectly timed and truly spectacular debut album Drums, 2011’s third release Portamento was evidently rushed, bringing about clear reminiscence of previous material – sun-drenched melodies, driving bass and guy-likes-girl lyrics cloaked in airy reverb. Although, front man Jonathan Pierce brought a more personal approach of religion to the new release – the album cover featuring a young red-eyed Pierce glazing into the camera, burdened by a hanging crucifix on the wall behind him. In fact, many lyrics throughout the album, especially those in ‘Book Of Revelation’, showcase his atheist views, “I’ve seen the world/ And there’s no heaven and there’s no hell”. 

Whilst the beginning of the set whiffed of the slight sense of unease, it didn’t take long for the band to propel themselves into full-action mode, Pierce dropping one of the very highlights of the first album ‘Best Friend’ two songs in, a strange and twisted story of the death of an intimate companion,“You were my best friend/ but then you died”. With the introduction of new members to their live performances, the sound is certainly tighter to say the least. Throughout the latter of the night, it’s evident the group are aiming to play the more favourable classics,surfing on their chiming summer-soaked melodies and infectious vocals; ‘Forever And Ever Amen’ does a swift job of involving the close-knit crowd, whilst rousing renditions of ‘Me And The Moon’ and ‘Jonny Don’t Be A Jerk’ treat the closely-knit crowd well. Pierce cuts a flowing figure throughout, closing his eyes as he rides pulsing rhythms of Morrisey-style stage-presence referencing sunny-side Beach Boy’s and British 1980’s indie-rock totems Orange Juice and The Pastels.

The Drums – Book of Revelation

 

Despite being relatively new to Portamento material, the audience don’t take long to catch on to sophomore material ‘Book Of Revelation’ and ‘Days’, whilst ‘Money’ – a tail of wanting to buy someone a gift and not being able to afford it – attracts sufferers of the recession and looters alike. One obvious change in terms of sound in the new album is the introduction of airy synthesizers adding more texture, ‘How It Ended’ delivering unnerving notes. However, as the encore drears on it is clear the songs insinuate a lack of variety, guitarist Connor Hanwick previously admitting he doesn’t even know what chords are. Unsurprisingly and, unfortunately to say the least, glistening ‘Let’s Go Surfing’ is boycotted, Pierce announcing his anger at a crowd member for continuously requesting the song leaving many fans scratching their heads. Whilst Drums have been mistaken in the past for being period to past icons, they are an eccentric piece of lovingly engaging music that not even the most critical can detract.

Advertisements